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How to Start

Photo by Karolina Grabowska

  By Katie Odom   I don’t know how to start. I stare at the blank paper between my hands. I pick up the pen, hold it loosely, hover the point over the paper, and set the pen down.  I study the grain of the wood within the table. Lines swirl, curl, and flow from this side to that. My ...

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Strategic Plan

Photo by Adam Bartoszewicz on Unsplash

  By Janel Boyd   When I am an old(er) woman, I shall wear yoga pants with impunity and t-shirts of the softest Pima cotton and flip flops every day. I’ll pull my coarse white hair into a ponytail without combing it. Or make a thick braid to fit under the sloppy straw hat I’ll wear when I garden in ...

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God, Please Save Odessa

Photo by Max Kukurudziak on Unsplash

  By Irene Sulyevich First published in Landslide Lit(erary) publication on Medium.com (Note: on the Medium.com platform, the writer retains full rights to her story. Reprints, thus, are permitted) When a war in Ukraine began two weeks ago, I got a lot of calls and messages asking how I feel about this conflict. While appreciating the thoughtfulness and support from ...

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How the Supreme Court’s potential new ruling is not only bad for women, but also for the children and families they claim to protect

Photo by Ian Hutchinson on Unsplash

  By Alisa Childress   First published on An Injustice! On Medium.com (Note: on the Medium.com platform, the writer retains full rights to her story. Reprints, thus, are permitted) https://medium.com/an-injustice/scotus-and-the-future-of-women-thoughts-from-a-progressive-in-a-red-state-2deb11a83987   When my son was born, over 19 years ago, my mother, as all proud new grandmothers do, came to the hospital to see us. I was induced overnight Friday ...

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The Soundtrack of a Life

  by Alisa Richie Childress My dad was terrified for months before turning seventy years old. His birthday is in mid-October, amidst back to school and Halloween and just before the other, bigger holidays. Because of this, I was never consistent about celebrating him. Some years, I would fix dinner for him and my stepmom. Some years, I would buy ...

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Revisions are like onions: they have layers, and they make you cry.

by Pam Lafollette   As I work on revision #437 of my novel-in-progress, I reflect on what it took to get this manuscript to where it is today. My first novel was 485,000 words: about the size of War and Peace and riddled with the inherent mistakes of a novice—telling-not-showing, meandering prose, lack of conflict, lack of pacing, overuse of ...

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The ‘I’ is Not Enough

by Kimberly Crum Exploring point-of-view in your writing     “I have wanted you to see out of my eyes so many times.” ~Elizabeth Berg~ Perhaps, you write creative nonfiction — personal essay, memoir, literary journalism. You use fictional techniques to create true stories. But the first-person pronoun, at times, feels a bit narcissistic. And, you tire of the relentless ...

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A Good Death

by Jessica Hildebrand   May all beings attain happiness. Death in the time of pandemic. Of course. It is happening hourly in hospitals all over the world as humanity faces the Covid-19 virus, which seems to take people indiscriminate of gender, race, age or ethnicity. Doctors, nurses and caregivers work exhaustively and selflessly around the clock to save as many ...

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The Problem of Happiness.

  by Kimberly Crum   True stories by ordinary people are commonly referred to as the “nobody memoir.” We lack the plot line of celebrity. No rags turned to riches. No lonely child turned superstar. We are still working on the arcs of our plots. Neither famous nor infamous, the typical nobody memoirist describes the most intense incidents of a ...

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